Information Trust Institute block of abstract images
Information Trust Institute block of abstract images

Welcome Address

Speaker:

David Nicol
Director, Information Trust Institute
Franklin W. Woeltge Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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(Video runs from 02:00 - 23:20)

Biography:

David M. Nicol received a B.A. in mathematics (magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) from Carleton College in 1979. Following three years in industry with the Control Data Corporation, he attended the University of Virginia, where he received an M.S. in 1983 and a Ph.D. in 1985, both in computer science.

He was a staff scientist for the Institute for Computer Applications in Science in Engineering from 1985 to 1987, and then served on the computer science faculties at the College of William and Mary (1987-1996) and Dartmouth College (1996-2003). In 2003 David joined the ECE faculty.

He has held many professional service roles (including editor-in-chief of the ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation), has authored over 200 publications in leading conferences and journals, is co-author of a widely used undergraduate text Discrete Event System Simulation (5th edition), and has been principal investigator (PI) or co-PI on over $67 million of research grants and contracts. He is considered a leading expert on the modeling and simulation of discrete event systems, and is frequently called upon to consult with industry and government, particularly in the use of these techniques to assess the trustworthiness of systems that monitor and control critical infrastructure (e.g., power, transportation, telecommunication).

Since 2011, David has served as director of the Information Trust Institute at the University of Illinois, which brings together University and industry researchers to study trustworthy and secure information systems. Among the several centers within ITI, David is the PI of the Boeing Center for Trusted Software, and the National Security Agency Lablet for the Science of Security.

David and his students develop methodologies for assessing the trustworthiness (e.g., security, reliability, resiliency) of large-scale systems. They also develop model-based security solutions for networks, such as the validation of firewall configurations in enterprise systems, flow analysis identifying the potential for information leakage in highly secured systems, lightweight authentication and integrity mechanisms in distributed ad-hoc networks, protection against malware propagation within advanced metering infrastructures, and provable isolation of information streams at different security levels within a graphics system. Most of his graduated students have become academics themselves or joined government research labs.

He was elected Fellow of the IEEE and of the ACM. In 2007, David received the inaugural ACM SIGSIM Distinguished Contributions Award. He has been an ACM distinguished lecturer from 2007 to the present.

Speaker:

José Meseguer
Professor, Computer Science
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Biography:

José Meseguer received a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Zaragoza, Spain. He is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). Prior to moving to UIUC he was a Principal Scientist as the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), after having held postdoctoral positions at the University of California at Berkeley and IBM Research. He was also an Initiator Member of Stanford University's Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI).

Dr. Meseguer has made fundamental contributions in the frontier between mathematical logic, executable formal specification and verification, declarative programming languages, programming methodology, concurrency, and security. His work in all these areas, comprising over 300 publications, is very highly cited. The Maude language is one of the most advanced and efficient executable formal specification languages. It supports a wide range of formal analyses, including symbolic simulation, search, model checking, and theorem proving. It is also an advanced declarative concurrent language with sophisticated object-oriented features and powerful module composition and reflective meta-programming capabilities. He, his collaborators, and other researchers have used Maude and its tool environment to build sophisticated systems and tools, and to specify and analyze many systems, including cryptographic protocols, active network protocols, models of cell biology, executable formal semantics of programming languages, formal analyzers for conventional code, theorem provers, and tools for interoperating different formal systems. He has given numerous invited lectures at international scientific meetings and has taught advanced courses on his research at leading American, British, German, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese universities and research centers. He has also served in numerous program committees of international scientific conferences and as editor of various scientific journals.